Tag Archives: Japanese

One-Pot Japanese Curry Chicken and Rice

An easy weeknight version of Indian curry, this Japanese-riff is a one-pot meal featuring juicy chicken thighs, vegetables and rice. Instead of relying on store-bought or homemade instant curry roux, the recipe builds on a few spices to mimic traditional Japanese curry flavors.

Curry powder, ground nutmeg and Worcestershire sauce are combined and bloomed in butter to create the round and rich sauce. Onions, potatoes and carrots create the bulk of traditional Japanese curry. You can easily substitute sweet potatoes, cauliflower and/or peas to address family preferences.

Kay Chun’s original recipe called for 2 pounds of large chicken thighs. The math doesn’t add up here. We bought a package nearly 2 1⁄2 pounds containing only 5 thighs—and they weren’t necessarily “large,” so if you were serving 6 people, that would be a challenge. I say forget the poundage, and just buy 6 large thighs—there is enough rice mixture to support that many servings.

It is suggested you serve in bowls. Maybe because we used a “paella” rice which is really absorbent, there wasn’t much liquid and could have been served on plates. Speaking of liquid, of course we used homemade stock which adds oodles of flavor. And we nearly doubled the amount of minced fresh ginger to really amp up the Asian flavor.

One-Pot Japanese Curry Chicken and Rice

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs
  • 2 Tbsp. canola oil
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 3 Tbsp. Madras curry powder
  • 1 Tbsp. minced garlic
  • 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger
  • 3/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 cups short-grain white rice, rinsed until water runs clear
  • 1 large baking potato (about 1 lb.), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 3 medium carrots, sliced 1/2-inch-thick
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • Chopped scallions pickles, kimchi and/or hot sauce, for serving

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Rub chicken with 1 tablespoon oil, and season with salt and pepper.
  2. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot (at least 3 1⁄2 quarts), heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil with 1 tablespoon butter over medium until butter is melted. Working in two batches, brown chicken 3 to 4 minutes per side, and transfer to a plate.
  3. Add onion to the pot, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until softened, 2 minutes. Add curry powder, garlic, ginger, nutmeg and the remaining 2 tablespoons butter, and stir until butter is melted and spices are fragrant, 1 minute.
  4. Add rinsed rice and stir until evenly coated in spices. Add potato, carrots, broth and Worcestershire sauce, scraping bottom of pot to lift up any browned bits. Season broth generously with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken and any accumulated juices on top, skin-side up, and bring to a boil over high. Cover and bake for 20 minutes.
  5. Uncover and bake until most of the liquid is absorbed and chicken is golden and cooked through, about 10 minutes longer.
  6. Divide chicken and rice among bowls, and garnish with scallions. If desired, serve with any combination of pickles, kimchi and hot sauce.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Adapted from a recipe by Kay Chun for NY Times Cooking

Japanese Ginger Pork

Japanese Ginger Pork (Shogayaki) is a recipe hailing from Milk Street. They explain that shoga means “ginger” in Japanese, and yaki translates as “grilled,” though the term is sometimes applied to foods that are fried or griddled. In the popular dish known as shogayaki, thinly sliced pork is cooked with a lightly sweetened, very gingery soy-based sauce.

Here, pork tenderloins are cut into quarters and pounded into thin cutlets. A quick soak in a marinade that later becomes the sauce ensures the cutlets are thoroughly flavored. Shredded green cabbage and steamed rice are the classic accompaniments so we paired them with the entrée.

In Japan, the meat of choice for shogayaki is thinly sliced pork loin. The thin cuts of meat cook quickly and make it easier for the seasonings to penetrate. But because making thin, even slices requires some challenging knife work, the thin slices of pork tenderloin are pounded even thinner. As a bonus, the pounding breaks apart the muscle fibers, making it even easier for the meat to season. Additionally, ginger has an enzyme called zingibain that helps tenderize meat.

After another recipe once-over, we decided to double the sauce—soy sauce through fresh ginger. We’re glad we did, but would not double the white sugar next time, it was a tad too sweet. Another major change we made was to coat the shredded cabbage with a one-to-one mixture of rice vinegar and toasted sesame oil with a pinch of salt. Overall, we feel the cabbage should be increased by utilizing the entire head, especially if this meal is to feed four. Finally, we also added an extra half bunch of scallions.

TIP: Don’t crowd the skillet when cooking the cutlets. It’s usually best to cook them in two batches so they brown rather than steam. But how they fit in the skillet depends on their shape after pounding. If you can fit all four in your pan without them touching, cook all at once using the 2 tablespoons of oil.

Japanese Ginger Pork (Shogayaki)

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 3 Tbsp. mirin
  • 2 Tbsp. sake
  • 1 Tbsp. white miso
  • 1½ Tbsp. finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1¼ 1b. pork tenderloin, trimmed of silver skin
  • 2 Tbsp. grapeseed or other neutral oil
  • 2 tsp. white sugar
  • 1 bunch scallions, cut into 1-inch piece
  • ½ small head green cabbage, cored and finely shredded (about 3 cups)
  • 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil
  • Cooked Japanese-style short-grain rice, to serve

Directions

  1. In a wide, shallow bowl whisk together the soy sauce, mirin, sake, miso and ginger.
  2. Cut the pork tenderloin in half crosswise, making the tail-end half slightly larger, then cut each piece in half lengthwise. Place 2 pieces of pork between 2 large sheets of plastic wrap. Using a meat pounder, gently pound each piece to an even ¼-inch thickness. Repeat with the 2 remaining pieces.
  3. Add the cutlets to the soy mixture and turn to coat, then let marinate at room temperature for 15 minutes.
  4. Mix the rice vinegar and toasted sesame oil together then add to a large bowl with the shredded cabbage and a pinch of salt. Mix well, and set aside.
  5. In the meantime, cook the Japanese rice according to package directions.
  6. Remove the cutlets from the marinade, letting the excess drain back into the bowl; reserve the marinade. Pat the cutlets dry with paper towels.
  7. In a 12-inch skillet over medium-high, heat 1 tablespoon of oil until shimmering. Add the cutlets in a single layer and cook undisturbed until well browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Using tongs, flip each piece and continue to cook until the second sides are well browned, about another 2 minutes.
  8. Transfer to a large plate, then wipe out the skillet with paper towels. Repeat with the remaining oil and cutlets.
  9. Return the skillet to medium-high and add the reserved marinade, the sugar and ¼ cup water. Bring to a simmer and cook, scraping up any browned bits, until the mixture thickens and a spoon drawn through it leaves a 1- to 2-second trail, about 3 minutes. (Because we doubled the sauce, it took twice as long to thicken properly.)
  10. Stir in the scallions, then add the pork and any accumulated juices. Cook, stirring gently, until the scallions are wilted and the pork is heated through, about 1 minute.
  11. Serve with the shredded cabbage and cooked rice.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe by Courtney Hill for Milk Street