Tag Archives: cod

Basque-Style Fish and Clams in Parsley-Garlic Sauce

The Hubs was thrilled with this recipe because it has clams, and we rarely cook anything with clams because I don’t eat them. It’s a consistency thing with me. I enjoy their broth, and when they’re cut up and chopped into things, but not whole clams.

The Spanish dish—Merluza en Salsa Verde con Almejas, or hake in green sauce with clams—is a classic dish from the Basque Country in northern Spain. Hake has been one of my favorite white flaky fishes ever since I enjoyed it for the very first time in Northern Spain in 2013. Problem is, it’s near impossible to source in these parts, so cod is a reasonable substitute.

In this recipe, fish fillets are gently simmered until flaky in a parsley, garlic and olive oil sauce, then are finished with cooked clams in their shells. Milk Street adapted this formula from seaside restaurant Txoko Getaria, and devised a method that requires only a food processor and a skillet but yields delicious results in only about an hour.

The cubanelle pepper (or jalapeño chili) is a stand-in for hard-to-source Basque guindilla chilies. And if you cannot find Idiazabal cheese, a Basque sheep’s-milk cheese with a subtle smokiness, Manchego is a good substitute.

Don’t omit the cheese. The pairing of fish and cheese is indeed unusual but the Idiazábal lends complex flavor without tasting distinctly cheesy. After adding the fish to the skillet, don’t allow the poaching liquid to reach a full simmer; slow, gentle bubbling is best to ensure the fillets are perfectly cooked.

Basque-Style Fish and Clams in Parsley-Garlic Sauce

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 oz. Idiazábal or Manchego cheese (without rind), cut into rough 1″ chunks
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • Kosher salt
  • 5 cups lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves and tender stems
  • ½ cup plus ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 4 6-oz. firm white fish fillets (about 1” thick), such as hake, cod or grouper
  • 5 medium garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 Cubanelle pepper or jalapeño chili, stemmed, halved lengthwise, seeded and sliced into thin half rings
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 lbs. hardshell clams (about 1½” in diameter), such as manila or littleneck
  • 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour

Directions

  1. In a food processor, combine the cheese, almonds and ½ teaspoon salt. Process until finely chopped, about 20 seconds. Add the parsley and process until chopped, about 10 seconds. With the machine running, add the ½ cup oil, then process until smooth, about 1 minute, scraping the bowl as needed; set aside.
  2. Season the fish all over with salt. In a 12-inch skillet over medium, combine the remaining ¼ cup oil, the garlic and Cubanelle pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the garlic begins to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the wine and bring to a boil over medium-high. Cook, stirring, until the wine reduces by half, about 4 minutes.
  3. Add 1 cup water and bring to a boil. Add the clams, cover and cook, occasionally shaking the skillet, until the clams have opened, about 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and, using a slotted spoon, transfer the clams to a bowl, discarding any that have not opened; cover to keep warm.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk the flour and ½ cup of the broth mixture until smooth, then whisk the mixture into the broth in the skillet. Bring to a simmer over medium, stirring often; the liquid will thicken. Add the fish skin/skinned side up, then cover, reduce to low and cook for 4 minutes, adjusting the heat as needed to maintain a very gentle simmer.
  5. Using a wide metal spatula, carefully flip the fillets. Re-cover and cook until the centers of the fillets are opaque and reach 120°F, another 2 to 4 minutes. Using the spatula, transfer the fillets to serving bowls.
  6. Return the sauce to a simmer over medium, then stir in the parsley puree and remove from the heat. Taste and season with salt. Pour the sauce over the fish and top with the clams.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe from Courtney Hill for Milk Street

Steamed Fish with Shiitake Mushrooms

Lean white fish is mild in flavor, so before steaming the fillets we season it boldly with garlic, ginger, oyster sauce and fiery-sweet Sriracha. We often carve out the start of our weekday meals for a “Meatless Monday” and this combo from Milk Street (MS) fit the bill.

From their “New Rules Cookbook” it emphasizes a gentle heat as best for keeping the delicate flesh of fish tender. Steaming is ideal because the heat surrounds the fish, cooking it from all sides without movement. An aromatic sauce is added to complement the mild fish.

Because we are fungi fanatics, we increased the shiitake mushrooms by 50% for a total of 12 ounces. For a little spice, drizzle the plated fish fillets with a little chili oil before sprinkling with the scallions. Or sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds. Serve with steamed or stir-fried greens and jasmine rice.

Pairing the cod with stir-fried baby bok choy made with garlic, ginger soy and a few red pepper flakes, and a side of steamed jasmine rice brought the entire dinner together. And plating it all on a singular platter makes for an easy presentation and allows each diner to serve themselves as much as they want.

Simple. Healthy. Tasty. What more could you ask for?

Steamed Fish with Shiitake Mushrooms

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp. oyster sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. sriracha
  • 1 Tbsp. grapeseed or other neutral oil
  • 8 medium garlic cloves, finely grated
  • 1 Tbsp. finely grated fresh ginger
  • 3 Tbsp. soy sauce, divided
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 4 6-oz. skinless cod, haddock or halibut fillets (each about 1 inch thick)
  • 8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 Tbsp. unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced

Directions

  1. In a shallow bowl or pie plate, whisk together the oyster sauce, Sriracha sauce, oil, garlic, ginger, 2 tablespoons of soy sauce and ½ teaspoon each salt and pepper. Add the fillets and turn to coat, gently rubbing in the sauce.
  2. Add the mushrooms and toss until evenly coated. Marinate at room temperature for about 10 minutes.
  3. Place a steamer basket in a large Dutch oven. Add enough water to fill the bottom of pot without touching the basket. Remove the basket. Cover the pot and bring to a simmer over medium-high.
  4. Meanwhile, mist the steamer basket with cooking spray. Arrange the fish in an even layer in the basket and top the fillets with the mushrooms, evenly arranging them. Return the basket to the pot, cover and steam over medium until the fish flakes easily, 8 to 12 minutes. (Ours took the entire 12 minutes.)
  5. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together the vinegar, sugar, the remaining 1 tablespoon soy sauce and ¼ cup water.
  6. When the fish is done, use a thin metal spatula to transfer the fillets and mushrooms to a platter. Sprinkle with the scallions and serve with the sauce on the side.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Adapted from a recipe for Milk Street

A Lesson on “Chashnee”

According to the Washington Post article where we found the recipe, this Spicy Tamarind Fish and Herb Stew isn’t just memorable, it offers a teachable moment. Cookbook author Naz Deravian uses it for a lesson on “chashnee,” a Persian word that describes “a particular ingredient,” a spice or special something, “that brightens the dish, bringing it to life, like lemon or vinegar,” and it changes from one region to another. In the Persian Gulf region of Iran, chashnee comes from incomparably tangy tamarind and the heat of chile pepper.

Ghalieh Mahi (Spicy Tamarind Fish and Herb Stew)

In our neck of the woods, halibut is more than twice the price of cod, so that’s our preference here. Keep in mind, the sauce is bold. In fact, we, who love spicy food, didn’t bother to add any cayenne. You may also prefer to remove the chile seeds to further tame the flavor. I do feel the brown sugar (which we used instead of honey) balanced the tanginess of the tamarind.

Fenugreek leaves, powder and seeds

Fenugreek seeds and powder are used in many Indian dishes for their nutritional profile and slightly sweet, nutty taste. If you’re unable to locate it at a nearby grocery store, you can check specialty markets or just order online like we did.

Beware, if you are not a cilantro lover, then this dish is not for you.

Spicy Tamarind Fish and Herb Stew

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 2 tsp. kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed to a paste or finely grated
  • 1 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1 red serrano or small jalapeño chile pepper, thinly sliced, plus more for garnish
  • 3 bunches fresh cilantro, tough stems trimmed, finely chopped (5 to 6 cups, chopped); plus some whole leaves reserved for optional garnish
  • 2 Tbsp. dried fenugreek, or 1/2 bunch fresh leaves, finely chopped; OR, 1 Tbsp. dried crushed seeds
  • 2 Tbsp. unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp. tamarind paste , dissolved in 2 cups warm water, plus more to taste
  • 2 Tbsp. tomato paste
  • 2 tsp. brown sugar or honey, plus more to taste (optional)
  • Cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 pounds cod, halibut or other firm-fleshed fish
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Cooked rice, for serving

Directions

  1. In a large pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until golden brown, about 6 minutes. Sprinkle with a little salt, reduce the heat to medium, and add the garlic, turmeric and chile pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  2. Add the cilantro and fenugreek and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant and the cilantro has considerably wilted, about 10 minutes. (This step actually only took 2 minutes for the cilantro to be completely wilted.)
  3. Add the flour and the 2 teaspoons of salt and stir to incorporate for 1 minute. Stir in the tamarind mixture and tomato paste. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, until thickened, about 10 minutes.
  4. Taste as it simmers. If the sauce is too sour, add the sugar or honey to take the edge off the tang. Taste again for salt (keep in mind you will salt the fish as well), heat (add cayenne if you like), and more tang from tamarind.
  5. Meanwhile, cut the fish into 2-inch pieces and season well with salt and black pepper. Raise the heat to medium, add the fish, and simmer, uncovered, until the fish cooks through, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir gently to make sure nothing sticks to the bottom of the pan. If the stew gets too watered-down, remove the fish and raise the heat to reduce the sauce a little, if it’s too dry, add a little more water.
  6. Garnish with more chile peppers and cilantro leaves, if you like, and serve with rice.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe compliments of Justin Tsucalas for The Washington Post

Moroccan Cod Tagine for Two

The bright colors and flavors literally pop off the plate in this lovely, healthy fish tagine. And with a few tweaks, we bolstered that brightness by doubling the amount of carrots and green olives. Pairing it with a side of tricolored couscous to help soak up the luscious sauce didn’t harm the color palette either!

For a bright, flavorful fish tagine, start by salting chunks of cod to season the flesh and help it retain moisture. Coat the fish in chermoula, a flavorful herb-spice paste of cilantro, garlic, cumin, paprika, cayenne, lemon juice, and olive oil, just before cooking to season its exterior.

Softening bell pepper, onion, and carrot before adding the tomatoes and fish ensures that the vegetables will be soft and tender by the time the fish has cooked through. Preserved lemon and olives add acidity, complexity, and salty punch to the broth. To produce moist, flaky cod, turn off the heat once the broth is bubbling at the bottom of the pot and allow the fish to cook in the residual heat.

You can substitute red snapper or haddock for the cod as long as the fillets are 1 to 1½ inches thick. Picholine or Cerignola olives work well in this recipe. Serve this dish with flatbread, couscous, or rice.

Moroccan Cod Tagine for Two

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces skinless cod fillets (1 to 1½ inches thick), cut into 1½- to 2-inch pieces
  • ½ teaspoon table salt, divided
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, plus 2 tablespoons chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¾ teaspoon paprika
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • ½ onion, sliced through root end ¼ inch thick
  • ½ green bell pepper, cut into ¼-inch strips
  • 1 small carrot, peeled and sliced on bias
  • ¼ inch thick¾ cup canned diced tomatoes
  • 3 tablespoons pitted green olives, quartered lengthwise
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped preserved lemon

Directions

  1. Place cod in bowl and toss with ¼ teaspoon salt. Set aside.
  2. Pulse cilantro leaves, garlic, cumin, paprika, and cayenne in food processor until cilantro and garlic are finely chopped, about 12 pulses. Add lemon juice and pulse briefly to combine. Transfer mixture to small bowl and stir in 1½ tablespoons oil. Set aside.
  3. Heat remaining 1½ tablespoons oil in large saucepan over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion, bell pepper, carrot, and remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and cook, stirring frequently, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and their juice, olives, and preserved lemon. Spread mixture in even layer on bottom of saucepan.
  4. Toss cod with cilantro mixture until evenly coated, then arrange cod over vegetables in single layer. Cover and cook until cod starts to turn opaque and juices released from cod are simmering vigorously, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat and let stand, covered, until cod is opaque and just cooked through (cod should register 140 degrees), 3 to 5 minutes. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro and serve.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Adapted from a recipe by Cook’s Illustrated