Tag Archives: Spanish chorizo

Fideos with Chorizo and Arugula

Spanish fideos are thin, vermicelli-like noodles that typically are used to make a paella-like dish also called fideos. According to Milk Street where we obtained this recipe, the noodles are toasted until golden before cooking to bring out a nutty flavor and aroma. Here, vermicelli or angel hair pasta, broken into small pieces, is matched with rich and meaty Spanish chorizo, fire-roasted tomatoes that accentuate the smoky notes of the sausage, and peppery arugula or grassy parsley for fresh color and flavor.

TIP: Don’t forget to remove the paper casing off of the chorizo.

The real challenge is breaking the pasta down into 1 inch-sized pieces without spraying them all over the kitchen. Most of ours were actually 2 inches in length and it worked out fine, although, we did need to sweep up the floor some…

We paired ours with steamed broccolini, but a simple salad and/or crusty bread are perfect accompaniments too.

Fideos with Chorizo and Arugula

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp. neutral oil
  • 4 oz. Spanish chorizo, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 8 oz. vermicelli or angel hair pasta, broken into rough 1-inch lengths
  • 3 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 14½ oz. can diced fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 4 cups lightly packed baby arugula, chopped OR 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, chopped OR a combination
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Directions

  1. In a 12-inch skillet, cook the oil and chorizo, stirring, until the oil turns red and the chorizo begins to sizzle. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a small bowl.
  2. Add the pasta to the oil in the skillet and cook, stirring, until evenly browned, about 5-7 minutes.
  3. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant.
  4. Add the tomatoes with juices and 2 cups water. Simmer, uncovered and stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat to maintain a simmer, until the pasta is tender and the majority of the liquid has evaporated, about 15 minutes.
  5. Place the arugula in a large pasta bowl, add the chorizo, then top with the hot pasta mixture. Stir until well combined. Season with salt and pepper.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Adapted from a recipe from Julia Rackow for Milk Street

Salmon with Sweet Peppers and Chorizo

The rich flavor and firm texture of salmon, one of our favorite fish, pair perfectly with sweet peppers made into pipérade, a Basque relish-like stew of peppers, tomatoes, onion and garlic. Piment d’esplette is the authentic seasoning for pipérade, but instead a combination of sweet paprika and cayenne is used, both of which are probably already in your pantry.

And for smoky, meaty flavor, sauté slices of Spanish chorizo; the rendered fat helps cook the vegetables and the browned chorizo simmers with peppers for a few minutes at the end. We prefer salmon at medium-well doneness—that is, cooked until the center is no longer translucent. To cook the fish until opaque throughout, simmer the fillets for a few minutes longer, or until the center reaches 130°F to 135°F. Serve with warm, crusty bread if desired.

Tip: Don’t forget to place the salmon skin side up in the pan. This way, while the fillets cook gently in the pepper mixture, the skin, which we remove before serving, protects the surface from drying out. Also, don’t allow the pepper mixture to simmer vigorously while the fish is in the skillet. Medium heat should ensure a gentle simmer, but adjust the burner as needed.

Salmon with Sweet Peppers and Chorizo

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 4 6-oz. center-cut salmon fillets
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 2 oz. Spanish chorizo, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 2 medium red or orange bell peppers (or 1 of each), stemmed, quartered lengthwise, seeded and thinly sliced crosswise
  • 1 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp. sweet paprika
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
  • ¼ cup dry vermouth or white wine
  • 14½ oz. can diced tomatoes
  • 3 large thyme sprigs

Directions

  1. Season the salmon on both sides with salt. In a 12-inch skillet over medium, combine the oil and chorizo and cook, stirring occasionally, until the oil has taken on a reddish hue and the chorizo begins to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the chorizo to a small plate and set aside.
  2. Set the skillet over medium-high and heat the fat until shimmering. Add the bell peppers, onion, paprika, cayenne and ½ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are wilted and tender, 5 to 8 minutes.
  3. Add the vermouth and cook, scraping up any browned bits, until the wine has evaporated, about 1 minute.
  4. Add the tomatoes with juices along with the thyme, then bring to a simmer. Nestle the salmon fillets, skin-side up, in the mixture. Reduce to medium, cover and simmer, until the thickest parts of the fillets reach 115°F to 120°F, 6 to 8 minutes. If you want your salmon opaque throughout, cook a few minutes longer.
  5. Remove the pan from the heat. Using tongs, carefully peel off and discard the skin from each fillet. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the salmon to serving plates, flipping each piece so the skinned side faces down.
  6. Bring the pepper mixture to a simmer over medium-high, add the chorizo and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, 2 to 4 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Remove and discard the thyme, then spoon the mixture over and around the salmon and drizzle with additional oil.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Spanish Chorizo, Ham and White Bean Stew

Having made the traditional recipe—which takes hours—we were thrilled to find this quick-and-easy version of the Spanish tapa known as Fabada Asturiana, a hearty stew of dried beans, sausage and other smoky, porky ingredients.

A number of years ago on our first trip to Spain, we were lucky enough to enjoy an authentic fabada, shown above, in the little Austurian town of Cabrales in Northern Spain. The Hubs liked it so much, he bought the ingredients and smuggled them home. Luckily (or not), because I had suffered a broken foot a few days earlier, we were whisked through airport customs back home, preventing our illegal meats and beans from being confiscated. (I don’t advise this tactic as a long term plan 🤣 )

I digress, back to the recipe at hand… Based on the changes from Milk Street, we pared back on the meats, using only chorizo and ham, both of which lend deep flavor to the broth. The dish gets its name from the large beans that are traditionally used in its preparation, but canned white beans work quite well. Preferred are the relatively large size and creamy texture of cannellinis, but great northern and navy beans are fine, too.

A pinch of saffron adds a very Spanish flavor and fragrance, while giving the stew an alluring golden hue. The color and flavor were also amped up from our homemade ham stock, which replaced the chicken broth.

The Hubs was sorely tempted to add a pinch of pimentón, but restrained himself from adding it to the stew. However, he did decide to sneak it onto the toasted crusty bread. BTW, it will serve six as a first course, or four as the main entrée.

TIP: Don’t overcook the chorizo and ham after adding it to the sautéed onion mixture. If the pieces begin to sear or brown, they’ll be chewy and rubbery in the finished dish. Cook only until the chorizo begins to release some of its fat.

  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • Tbsp.  extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 medium garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tsp. saffron threads
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 8 oz. Spanish chorizo, casings removed, halved and thinly sliced
  • 8 oz. ham steak, cut into ½-inch cubes
  • 1½ qts. chicken broth, or ham stock, preferably homemade
  • 3 15½-oz. cans white beans, rinsed and drained
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Warmed crusty bread, to serve

Directions

  1. In a large pot over medium, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the onion, garlic, saffron and ½ teaspoon each salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is slightly softened, 5 to 8 minutes.
  2. Add the chorizo and ham, then cook, stirring, just until the chorizo begins to release its fat, about 1 minute. Stir in the broth, beans and bay. Bring to a simmer over medium-high, then reduce to medium and cook, stirring occasionally and adjusting heat as needed to maintain a simmer, for 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. Remove and discard the bay, then stir in the scallions. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with bread.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe adapted from Courtney Hill for Milk Street

Salmon with Sweet Peppers and Chorizo

Never would I have conceived of assembling this eclectic group of ingredients, but WOW, it sure made a convert out of me! The rich flavor and firm texture of salmon paired perfectly with sweet peppers made into pipérade, a Basque relish-like stew of peppers, tomatoes, onion and garlic. Piment d’esplette is the authentic seasoning for pipérade, but instead Milk Street used a combination of sweet paprika and cayenne—both of which are probably already in your pantry.

And for smoky, meaty flavor, sauté slices of Spanish chorizo; the rendered fat helps cook the vegetables and the browned chorizo simmers with peppers for a few minutes at the end. For a medium doneness, cook the salmon until the center is translucent. To cook the fish until opaque throughout, simmer the fillets for a few minutes longer, or until the center reaches 125°F to 130°F

A few changes we made included using a single piece of salmon weighing one pound. Plus, the recipe called for only two ounces of Spanish chorizo, but with each link weighing three ounces, we included one entire sausage, which we thought was the perfect amount. The Hubs made the rice with a Spanish twist incorporating olive oil and a few smashed garlic cloves. Our side of asparagus not only lent healthy nutrients, it was a nice pop of color on the plate.

TIP: Don’t forget to place the salmon skin side up in the pan. This way, while the fillets cook gently in the pepper mixture, the skin, which is removed before serving, protects the surface from drying out. Also, don’t allow the pepper mixture to simmer vigorously while the fish is in the skillet. Medium heat should ensure a gentle simmer, but adjust the burner as needed.

Salmon with Sweet Peppers and Chorizo

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 6-oz. center-cut salmon fillets
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 2 oz. Spanish chorizo, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 2 medium red or orange bell peppers (or 1 of each), stemmed, quartered lengthwise, seeded and thinly sliced crosswise
  • 1 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp. sweet paprika
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
  • ¼ cup dry vermouth or white wine
  • 14½ oz. can diced tomatoes
  • 3 large thyme sprigs

Directions

  1. Season the salmon on both sides with salt. In a 12-inch skillet over medium, combine the oil and chorizo and cook, stirring occasionally, until the oil has taken on a reddish hue and the chorizo begins to brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the chorizo to a small plate and set aside.
  2. Set the skillet over medium-high and heat the fat until shimmering. Add the bell peppers, onion, paprika, cayenne and ½ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are wilted and tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Add the vermouth and cook, scraping up any browned bits, until the wine has evaporated, about 1 minute.
  3. Add the tomatoes with juices along with the thyme, then bring to a simmer. Nestle the salmon fillets, skin-side up, in the mixture. Reduce to medium, cover and simmer, until the thickest parts of the fillets reach 115°F to 120°F, 6 to 8 minutes.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat. Using tongs, carefully peel off and discard the skin from each fillet. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the salmon to serving plates, flipping each piece so the skinned side faces down.
  5. Bring the pepper mixture to a simmer over medium-high, add the chorizo and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, 2 to 4 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
  6. Remove and discard the thyme, then spoon the mixture over and around the salmon and drizzle with additional oil.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe by Courtney Hill for Milk Street