Tag Archives: corn

Spiced Chicken with Corn, Mushrooms and Zucchini

Although summer produce season was nearing its end, we easily scored some fresh corn and zucchini to make this flavorful Spiced Chicken with Corn, Mushrooms and Zucchini. It’s a one pan meal that’s ready in a total of 45 minutes. Cooked in a skillet, the spiced chicken takes on a brick-red hue with a moderately spicy kick. (You can adjust the amount of heat by adding or eliminating the amount of cayenne.)

Here gochugaru—Korean red chile flakes—imbues this one-skillet chicken and vegetable supper with its deep, savory flavor, gentle heat and a hint of smokiness. But don’t fret if you can’t find gochugaru, just substitute ancho chile powder, regular chili powder or chipotle chile powder (or choice) for a delicious but different taste profile. Add more cayenne or eliminate it to adjust the level of heat, which is moderate as written. (Gochugaru can be found at Asian markets, well stocked supermarkets or online.)

I got carried away and pounded the chicken breasts down to a 1/4″ instead of the indicated 1/2″. Not a problem as long as the meat is not overcooked and dried out. Adjust the cooking time so that the poultry registers 160°, then move to a plate and cover with foil.

The amount of chicken we made was over 1 1/2 pounds, which when hammered down made 4 large cutlets, and therefore had to be cooked in 2 batches. Once the veggies are done, pour the accumulated chicken juices into the pan and stir to distribute.

Yes, you can make this meal with frozen corn, but you will suffer from a loss of flavor. This summer was THE BEST corn season we’ve experienced in a long time. And this last batch in particular was astoundingly sweet and juicy!

Spiced Chicken with Corn, Mushrooms and Zucchini

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tsp. gochugaru (Korean chile flakes; may substitute ancho chile powder, regular chili powder or chipotle chile powder)
  • 3/4 tsp. kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 tsp. granulated garlic
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 1 1/4 lbs. boneless skinless chicken breast, pounded to 1/2-inch thick
  • 2 Tbsp. canola oil or another neutral oil, divided
  • 8 oz. fresh shiitake mushrooms or a mix of mushrooms such as shiitake, oyster and/or cremini, sliced
  • 2 to 3 Tbsp. water, plus more as needed
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced scallions, white and light green parts, plus dark greens for garnish
  • 1 Tbsp. minced or finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 medium zucchini (8 ounces), trimmed, quartered lengthwise and sliced 1/2-inch thick
  • 3-4 ears of corn, kernels sliced from cob

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, combine the gochugaru, 1/4 teaspoon salt, the granulated garlic and cayenne pepper. Sprinkle the spice mixture onto both sides of the chicken, rubbing it in a little with your fingers.
  2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil until shimmering. Add the chicken to the pan, reduce the heat to medium and cook until cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer the chicken to a plate.
  3. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the pan, followed by the mushrooms and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Add the water if the pan seems dry, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms have released their liquid and begin to brown, about 5 minutes.
  4. Stir in the scallions and ginger and cook until they soften, about 1 minute.
  5. Add the zucchini, corn and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook until the vegetables are tender, 3 to 5 minutes. If the pan seems dry, add more water as needed, a couple of tablespoons at a time.
  6. Pour any accumulated juices from the chicken into the pan with the vegetables, and then slice the chicken into strips.
  7. Serve the vegetables with the sliced chicken on top or on the side.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Loosely adapted from a recipe by Laura Chase de Formigny for The Washington Post

Mexican Sweet Corn Cake

With the end of corn season drawing to a close, you may be thinking what else could you make with freshly picked maize? Sweet corn is the most common variety of maize eaten directly off the cob. The ear is picked while the endosperm is in the “milk stage” so that the kernels are still tender. How about Mexican Sweet Corn Cake?

For starters, it is only slightly sweet, moist and nothing like cornbread, which is denser and cornier. The texture is softer and more velvety than cake. A hint of corn flavor, but less than you expect and a suggestion of sweetness without being sweet. Interested now?

According to Milk Street where we found this recipe, this simple baked treat is ubiquitous in Mexican food markets, street stalls and restaurants. Its texture lands somewhere between cake and cornbread while hinting at custard. In Mexico City, it’s commonly served for breakfast, but finished with a dusting of powdered sugar, it also makes a casual, homey dessert.

Fresh Mexican corn used for making this type of cake is starchier and drier than the fresh corn available in the U.S., so a bit of cornmeal is added here. If you have more than 250 grams (1½ cups) corn after cutting the kernels from the ears, it’s best to save the extra for another use rather than use it in this recipe; the additional moisture may make the cake too wet. Yellow corn yields a cake with a warm golden hue, but white corn also works.

Don’t use frozen corn kernels—it results in a dense, gummy texture. Made with fresh corn, the cake’s crumb is much lighter and softer. After adding the flour mixture to the corn puree, don’t whisk vigorously. Gentle mixing, just until no pockets of flour remain, will minimize gluten development so the cake bakes up tender.

Mexican Sweet Corn Cake

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 3 medium ears fresh corn, preferably yellow, husked
  • ¼ cup fine yellow cornmeal
  • 14 oz. can sweetened condensed milk
  • ¼ cup plain whole-milk yogurt
  • 1¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. kosher salt
  • 2 large eggs, plus 2 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
  • Powdered sugar, to serve

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 350°F with a rack in the middle position.
  2. Mist a 9-inch round cake pan with cooking spray. Using a chef’s knife, cut the kernels from the ears of corn. Measure 1½ cups kernels and add to a blender; if you have extra corn, reserve it for another use. To the blender, add the cornmeal, condensed milk and yogurt, then puree until smooth, 15 to 20 seconds, scraping down the blender as needed. Let stand for 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch, baking powder and salt.
  4. To the blender, add the whole eggs and yolks, and the oil; blend on low until smooth, 5 to 10 seconds.
  5. Pour the puree into a large bowl. Add the flour mixture and whisk just until evenly moistened and no lumps of flour remain.
  6. Transfer to the prepared cake pan and bake until golden and a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes.
  7. Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 30 minutes. Run a paring knife around the pan to loosen the cake, then invert directly onto the rack and lift off the pan. Re-invert the cake onto a serving platter and cool completely, about 1 hour.
  8. Serve dusted with powdered sugar.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Recipe from Milk Street

When Corn Reigns King

Because of the abundance of fresh produce in mid- to late-summer, we find ourselves gravitating to certain vegetables which have a limited growing season, one being sweet corn on the cob. It finds its way to our dinner table often as a side dish: hot, buttered and eaten right off the cob. But occasionally, we want to make it the star of the show, such as in this Smoky, Sweet Corn Chowder recipe. And September is synonymous with THE BEST, when corn reigns king.

Using corn sliced right off the cob, diced potatoes and veggies this easy chowder is finished with a bit of cream, a skosh of white wine and crispy bacon crumbles. Don’t throw the cobs away after removing the kernels, instead, add them to the broth to get even more of their milky goodness into the chowder.

We changed things up a bit, no surprise there. The original recipe called for 5 cups of water. Since we had some homemade ham stock in the freezer, we substituted that (and upped the quantity by 1 cup) for the water which of course adds tons of flavor. Then, figuring we would get more taste and substance from andouille sausage than ham hocks we made that switcharoo too.

Lastly, our bicolored ears of corn were not large so I added 6 ears worth, after all, it is the star of the show here. Because it all comes together fairly quickly when the cooking starts, prep the vegetables for the chowder before you begin cooking. All the chopping—that’s the most time-intensive part of the process. But oh so worth it, because corn reigns supreme and is crowned the king in this recipe.

Smoky Sweet Corn Chowder

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 4 slices bacon, chopped (more for garnish if desired)
  • 6 ears corn on the cob, cut off the cob (do not discard cobs)
  • 2 stalks celery, finely diced
  • 1 large Vidalia Onion
  • 1 lb. red or white potatoes, cut into 1/2″ dice (no need to peel)
  • 12 oz. Andouille sausage, sliced in half lengthwise, cut into 1/4″-thick half moons
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 small fennel bulb, trimmed, cored, finely diced (save fronds for garnish)
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 cups ham stock (or water)
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 2-3 Tbsp. white wine

Directions

  1. Chop the bacon and crisp it in a dutch oven. Transfer bacon crumbles to a paper towel lined plate to drain.
  2. Sauté the corn, celery, onion, fennel and garlic in the bacon renderings.
  3. Add herb bundle, stock (or water), half of the diced potatoes, bouillon, corn cobs and bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
  4. Remove the corn cobs and herb bundle and puree half of the soup in a blender until smooth.
  5. Add the chowder puree back to the pot and add the sausage, remaining potatoes, cream and white wine.
  6. Return the pot to a simmer over medium heat with the lid tightly secured for an additional 10 minutes until the potato is tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  7. Serve with chopped fennel fronds and bacon.

http://www.lynnandruss.com

Loosely adapted from a recipe by Dorie Greenspan